Why I don't think shock collars are animal abuse - SheKnows

Why isn’t a shock collar considered an instrument of torture for a non-human animal as well?
Photo provided by Flickr
Similarly to the shock method used in lower priced products, many of these dog shock collars utilize a pairing process that may have several hundred unique ids. The reasoning is that there is a 1/300 chance that two buyers of their product would be using the product at the same time. In theory this seems reasonable, however, in practice it would be business malpractice for us to design a dog training product with a 1/300 chance of being controlled by another unit we sold. These companies have the benefit of generally being overseas and not under the laws and jurisdiction of the United States of America. It takes time and skill to design an electronic dog training collar that utilized millions of uniques IDs to keep you and your pet safe.
Why isn’t a shock collar considered an instrument of torture for a non-human animal as well?
Photo provided by Flickr
In an article for the trade magazine "Office for veterinary service and food control", Dr. Dieter Klein compared the effects of shock collars with other electrical stimulation products; "Modern devices ... are in a range in which normally no organic damage is being inflicted. The electric properties and performances of the modern low current remote stimulation devices ... are comparable to the electric stimulation devices used in human medicine. Organic damage, as a direct impact of the applied current, can be excluded.” trained with electronic collars. Schalke’s report concluded,
Photo provided by FlickrA dog owner is facing animal cruelty charges after veterinarians discovered his pet’s vocal cords were damaged by a shock collar.
Photo provided by FlickrWhen used correctly, shock collars can help people live harmoniously among wild animals as well as train our pets, Hawley said.
Photo provided by Flickr
Dog training shock collar, also known as bark collar or e-collar in brief, has been used in the training of both dogs and cats since the late 1960s. They typically consist of 2 parts: a remote control with dial for intensity regulation and the actual collar, which is strapped around the animal’s neck. Whenever the pet misbehaves, its owner can send a short electric current to the animal’s skin that will serve as a punishment and warning against future offenses. While many dog training schools, including police academies, have been and still are employing shock collars to instill proper behavior in their four-legged students, there are presently many animal rights organizations all over the world which call for their banning due to the suffering, aggression and possible infections they cause. Below you will find the latest developments in the legislation on bark collars in the major English-speaking countries. Keeping true to its sobriquet, the land of opportunity poses absolutely no limitations, either federal or state, on the utilization of bark collars. Pet owners are allowed to use any collar brand available whenever and as long as they want. And regardless of the recent attempts of PETA and other similar organizations, the situation is unlikely to change in the foreseeable future. The only hope for champions of animal rights is that people who resort to using shock collars will eventually realize that they are inflicting intolerable pain to their pets and will begin to employ other, positive means in the education of their furry family members.As of 24 March 2010, Wales is the first country in the United Kingdom to prohibit the use of electric shock collars in the entire country. Passing the ban as part of the Animal Welfare Act, the Welsh government outlawed the utilization of e-collars in animal training, treatment and misconduct prevention, citing as grounds for this decision the inhumanity and cruelty involved in the use of these devices. I use a shock collar. I am not ashamed of this fact. But, I am also making strides to use the shock collar less and less. With every dog I train I am getting smarter and using the collar less. I do this not because there is anything wrong with the collar. The fact is (agreed upon by most egghead trainers) that positive techniques stick best. I know this as fact even as I continue to train with a shock collar. My toolkit is not yet deep enough to totally discard the shock collar. But I am committed to training my animals to a higher and higher standard, and this means I have to get smarter and use less electricity.