You Can Tell a Lot about an Animal by Its Snout - Neatorama

Here are some aquatic animals whose most prominent feature is their long snout.
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Protosuchians were small, mostly terrestrial animals with short snouts and long limbs. They had bony armor in the form of two rows of plates extending from head to tail, and this armor is retained by most modern crocodilians. Their vertebrae were convex on the two main articulating surfaces, and their bony palates were little developed. The mesosuchians saw a fusion of the to form a secondary bony palate and a great extension of the nasal passages to near the . This allowed the animal to breathe through its nostrils while its mouth was open under the water. The eusuchians continued this process with the interior nostrils now opening through an aperture in the pterygoid bones. The vertebrae of eusuchians had one convex and one concave articulating surface, allowing for a between the vertebrae, bringing greater flexibility and strength. The oldest known eusuchian is from the lower Cretaceous of the in the United Kingdom. It was followed by crocodilians such as the , the so-called 'hoofed crocodiles', in the . Spanning the Cretaceous and Palaeogene periods is the genus of North America, with six species, though its phylogenetic position is not settled.
Snouted Latin American animal
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More disturbing footage has emerged online showing another 'mutant' pig born in China.

The animal was born with three eyes and two snouts on a farm in a rural area in the south west of the country.

Owner He Ruxian said the piglet had been hand-reared since birth as its deformity makes it difficult to feed, according to the New China newspaper.

Despite being scared by the creature's bizarre appearance, He said she now thinks it is "quite cute".

China has seen numerous 'mutant' animals find fame on social media in recent weeks.
Many viewers are now speculating about the reason behind the animal's deformity - with some blaming environmental pollution.

Footage shows 'mutant' pig with two snouts and three eyes born in China. Chinese farmer shows off 'mutant' piglet with two snouts and three eyes. Mutant piglet born in China: Baby animal has two snouts and three eyes. Watch It ! Piglet born with 2 snouts, 3 eyes.

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Photo provided by FlickrAnimal with a flexible snout
Photo provided by FlickrIn short the longer snout/muzzle in different animals developed due to evolutionary advantage based mainly on diet.
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Body color is another area where these two crocodilians differ. The difference is apparent on their snouts as well as the rest of their bodies. Crocodiles are a medium grayish-green and even in the water they don’t appear to be very dark. Alligators are much darker, especially when wet. If you’re looking at one of these animals in a river or lake and all you can see is part of its head, the snout color will usually give away its identity.We would like to thank you for visiting our website! Please find below all Three-toed animal with a snout crossword clue answers and solutions for Universal Daily Crossword Puzzle. Since you have landed on our site then most probably you are looking for the solution of Three-toed animal with a snout crossword. Look no further because you’ve come to the right place! Our staff has just finished solving all today’s Universal daily crossword and the answer for Three-toed animal with a snout can be found belowWe would like to thank you for visiting our website! Please find below all Three-toed animal with a snout crossword clue answers and solutions for Universal Daily Crossword Puzzle. Since you have landed on our site then most probably you are looking for the solution of Three-toed animal with a snout crossword. Look no further because you’ve come to the right place! Our staff has just finished solving all today’s Universal daily crossword and the answer for Three-toed animal with a snout can be found belowWhat's in a snout? A lot. Jon Tennant, a doctoral researcher at Imperial College London, surveyed the shapes of the snouts of different cud-chewing animals. He found that both blunt and pointed snouts offer particular advantages.