Parrot species, Types of parrots that make a unique pet parrot

African Grey Parrot: Types of Pet ..
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Pet birds fall into two categories: the parrot-types and the non-parrot species. Parrots are characterized by a curved shape of their beaks. They are often colorful and are considered the most intelligent of birds. Many parrots are capable of imitating human speech. They vary in size and have very long life spans, up to 80 years for large Cockatoos, Amazons and Macaws. The most common types of pet parrot-type birds include:
All about Large Macaw parrots, the types of Large Macaws and keeping Large Macaws as pets, bird guides for each species with pictures.
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Pet birds fall into two categories: the parrot-types and the non-parrot species. Parrots are characterized by a curved shape of their beaks. They are often colorful and are considered the most intelligent of birds. Many parrots are capable of imitating human speech. They vary in size and have very long life spans, up to 80 years for large Cockatoos, Amazons and Macaws. The most common types of pet parrot-type birds include: Pet Parrots types:
Photo provided by FlickrAll about Mini Macaw parrots, the types of Mini Macaws, keeping Mini Macaws as pets, bird guides for each species with pictures.
Photo provided by FlickrAll about Mini Macaw parrots, the types of Mini Macaws, keeping Mini Macaws as pets, bird guides for each species with pictures.
Photo provided by Flickr
Besides parrots, several types of North American birds were captured and kept as pets by the Washingtons. During George Washington's presidency, affairs at his Virginia estate were managed by one of his favorite nephews, George Augustine Washington. In the summer of 1790, George Augustine wrote his uncle to say that "I fear the season is too far advanced to procure young Mocking Birds but shall endeavour to do it." Whether George Washington wanted these young birds for himself or someone else is unknown, but they were clearly intended as pets, possibly because they could be taught to sing. These colorful, graceful birds are full of energy. Being flock birds, parakeets are very social with each other and with people. They love attention, make wonderful pets, and are some of the most popular pet birds. There are many different types of parakeets and many are very colorful. The Budgie or Budgerigar, which is called "Parakeet" in the United States, is one of the best-known parakeets. However it is just of more than 120 species and sub-species. Whether you are looking for a good pet parrot or an aviary companion, there are many different types of parrots to choose from. There are about 372 parrot species from around the world. The greatest diversity of parrots are found in Australasia, Central America, and South America, but there are some very unique birds from other regions as well. Parakeets are a part of ancient history. They have been used as food and then kept as exotic pets over hundreds of years. These are some very early historical accounts: In the 1400's, when the New World was discovered, parrots began to arrive in Europe from the Central and South America and became quite popular. It was in the 19th century that European explorers and naturalists began further expanding the knowledge of birds as well as many other creatures. A romantic period ensued where birds became highly favored by British nobility and royalty. The late 1800's saw volumes of literature on all sorts of exotic birds and parrots. Central and South American parrots became popular in the United States, as they were more readily available here. Interest in parrot keeping continued in the United State throughout the 1900's. Parrots of all types arrived in abundance into the United States. A few parakeet species, including the Green Conure, were bred in the 1930's. In the 1960's even more species began to be produced in captivity, including the Sun Conure. The latter 1900's saw a large increase in aviculture and captive breeding. Concern for many species threatened with extinction resulting from deforestation and habitat destruction began to create concern around the world. In 1979 Herbert R. Axelrod, a renowned tropical fish expert and publisher of pet books, attended a meeting sponsored by the United Nations on endangered species. There he proposed that rare birds be placed in captive breeding to prevent the extinction of many rare species as a sensible approach to the problem. This helped open the doors to importation of many parrot species previously not available. Only Australia persisted in not allowing exportation. Today, although bird importation is greatly restricted, many parakeet species are successfully bred in captive and readily available.