Pet Turtles: Ornate Wood Turtle Care & Breeding | That Reptile Blog

The Central American Wood Turtle (also known as the Ornate Wood Turtle) is a popular pet.
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In my opinion, the Central American wood turtle is one of the smartest turtles in the world. Pets get used to handling and seem to recognize their owners, seeking them out for something neat to eat. Over time you will discover they are not shy and make very rewarding pets. This is a real winner!
The North American Wood Turtle is a good choice for pet owners who have never kept a turtle before.
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Temperatures are an important aspect for maintaining your Wood Turtle health and well-being. Temperatures should range from seventy to eighty degrees and it’s basking are should in the eighty-five to ninety degree range for optimal basking requirements. By day, be sure to use an incandescent build maximise your pet’s comfort, ceramic heaters or red/black reptile “night bulbs” are useful after dark to help maintain temperatures. Black Wood Turtles are popular pets because they have an outgoing personality.
Photo provided by FlickrBecause the Black Wood Turtle is an omnivorous breed, you can feed your pet a variety of foods.
Photo provided by FlickrCentral American Wood Turtles make wonderful pets because they become tame rather quickly, and they are intelligent and personable.
Photo provided by Flickr
The foreign and domestic sale of wood turtles is illegal, but some states let people collect them for pets. So all pet wood turtles are said to have been collected rather than purchased, and wildlife officers can rarely make a case against poachers. In Florida, 20- and 30-year-old adult turtles (supposedly bred in captivity) had been arriving at wholesalers by the pickuptruck load and finding their way to Europe. Equally stressed by the pet trade are spotted and map turtles. Bog turtles, declared federally threatened in 1997, go for about $1,000 each on the black market. “It seems impossible to think of someone catching a robin and selling it at a pet store,” says Garber. “We now take it for granted that those animals are totally off-limits, but in many cases catching and selling wild turtles is completely legal.” In September the Fish and Wildlife Service issued a “” on the petition for the turtle and initiated a status review. The Center then submitted extensive additional on declines of the turtle’s populations, demonstrating the urgent need for protections. The Service is two and a half years late on making a final determination on whether the turtle should be listed.

Wood turtles are found in Connecticut, Iowa, Maryland, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia and Wisconsin. Download a of the wood turtle for media use.Wood turtles have been hurt by channelization of rivers and streams, careless timber-harvesting practices along waterways, urbanization and agricultural practices including pesticide use. Their remaining populations tend to be isolated, greatly reducing the chances of their natural recovery in areas where their numbers have plummeted. Traditionally low survival rates among juvenile wood turtles have been made worse by the increased prevalence of turtle predators, such as raccoons and skunks, which thrive in urbanized areas. Wild collection for the pet trade is another threat to the turtle’s survival.Hurt by channelization of rivers and streams, careless timber-harvesting practices along waterways, urbanization and agricultural practices, including pesticide use, the wood turtles’ remaining populations tend to be isolated, greatly reducing the chances of their natural recovery in areas where their numbers have plummeted. Traditionally low survival rates among juvenile wood turtles have been made worse by the increased prevalence of turtle predators, such as raccoons and skunks, which thrive in urbanized areas. Wild collection for the pet trade is another threat to the turtle’s survival.